Rogues & Vagabonds

theatre, film & tv past and present 2001-2008 & 2013…

Category Archives: Articles

One great film noir for every year (1940-59) | BFI

Well, okay, I meant to post this in November last year. But I didn’t! To celebrate #Noirvember and the return to cinemas of The Big Heat and In a Lonely … Continue reading

08/20/2018 · 5 Comments

A Life in Focus: Peter Cushing, the actor who personified the horror genre | The Independent

The Independent revisits the life of a notable figure. This week: Peter Cushing, from Friday 12 August 1994 Peter Cushing was one of the handful of actors who defined the horror … Continue reading

08/14/2018 · 4 Comments

JULY 29, 1887: NAUGHTY NOMADS AND SINGING SOTS – Wretched Richard’s Almanac

Born in 1887, Sigmund Romberg moved to the United States in 1909 and, after a short resume builder in a pencil factory (as a sharpener?), found work as a pianist.  … Continue reading

07/29/2018 · 1 Comment

O’Gorman Brothers

Joe O’Gorman the Irish Comedian was born in Dublin on May 24th, 1863. Attaining a local reputation as a dancer and singer he resolved to try his luck in England … Continue reading

07/16/2018 · 2 Comments

Lyn Gardner: Don’t be ashamed of day job | you can be waiter and artist

“Please don’t feel ashamed of having a day job to support your dream of working in the arts. A lot of people feel that if you aren’t a full-time artist … Continue reading

07/14/2018 · 6 Comments

A Guide to Theater Etiquette the New York Way

I couldn’t have put it better myself! I am a dyed-in-the-ethically-sourced-sustainable-cashmere coastal lefty elitist. I am strenuously inclusionary and empathetic to a fault. I apologize to inanimate objects when I … Continue reading

07/11/2018 · 3 Comments

‘F**k the critics’ – remembering the pithy advice of agent Peggy Ramsay

For hot young playwrights in the 1960s and 1970s, the most sought-after agent was Peggy Ramsay. In her prime, her client list included Joe Orton, Alan Ayckbourn, David Hare, Christopher … Continue reading

07/07/2018 · 2 Comments

Critics, judge me for my work in Derry Girls and on the stage, not on my body | Nicola Coughlan | Opinion | The Guardian

As an actor, your body is a gift. I can use mine to play neurotic Clare Devlin in Channel 4’s Derry Girls, or a tough-edged courtesan in 18th-century London in … Continue reading

06/30/2018 · 8 Comments

War, love and weirdness: A Matter of Life and Death – 70 years on | Film | The Guardian

I’m sure I’ve posted about this film before but I make no apologies for re-blogging The Guardian’s article as I love the tale to pieces! The opening scenes of A … Continue reading

06/18/2018 · 10 Comments

Lyn Gardner: Every playwright – even Alan Bennett – needs a champion

Peter Hall was once at a party where a woman collared him and said: “What would poor Samuel Beckett’s career have been like if  Waiting for Godot hadn’t landed on … Continue reading

05/29/2018 · 6 Comments

From Game of Thrones to The Crown: the woman who turns actors into stars | News | The Guardian

Earlier this year, the casting director Nina Gold sat at the back of the stalls of the Criterion theatre in the West End and watched a group of students from … Continue reading

05/24/2018 · 2 Comments

Think William Shakespeare couldn’t come up with those plays, sceptics?

The Shakespeare authorship question has raised its head again, with Mark Rylance voicing his doubts about the ‘man from Stratford’ on BBC Radio 4’s Today programme, coinciding with a four-day … Continue reading

04/30/2018 · 5 Comments

Women are being excluded from the stage. It’s time for quotas | Julia Pascal | Opinion | The Guardian

It’s a century after some British women were allowed to vote, and a statue of the suffragist Millicent Fawcett is being unveiled in Parliament Square, so why is women’s presence … Continue reading

04/29/2018 · 2 Comments

The Long Read: The Leas Pavilion

In 2007 The Radnor Estate sold to Churchgate Developers for £3.2m a lease of 150 years on the Leas Pavilion and surrounding land. Planning Permission is due to lapse on the … Continue reading

04/16/2018 · 3 Comments

Anti-Semitism in Handel’s ‘Messiah’? | A R T L▼R K

The first production of Handel’s Messiah in Dublin in 1742 was also notable for the breakthrough performance of the contralto Susannah Cibber, who consequently became one of the biggest and … Continue reading

04/13/2018 · 1 Comment

A flying visit – A Shakespearean story arc… | Sue Vincent’s Daily Echo

The afternoon was drawing to a close and the chill of early spring was settling over Stratford-upon-Avon as we made our way back towards the car. There were still many … Continue reading

04/10/2018 · 6 Comments

How Anna Scher’s maverick acting school created so many working-class stars | Stage | The Guardian

For 50 years Anna Scher has taught acting to north London children, with many – such as Kathy Burke, Daniel Kaluuya and Adam Deacon – becoming household names. What is … Continue reading

04/03/2018 · 2 Comments

Carrie Hope Fletcher | singer, author and actor| interview

Her CV boasts stints in big-name West End productions and her vlogs attract a huge following, but the multi-talented performer, author and internet star tells Mark Bonington her upcoming show … Continue reading

03/29/2018 · 2 Comments

A message for UNESCO on World Theatre Day | openDemocracy

“And they cannot stop us. Each night we will reappear…” Half a mile from the Cyraneican coast in Northern Libya is a vast rock shelter. 80 metres wide and 20 … Continue reading

03/27/2018 · 5 Comments

The Life of Actress, Mary Wells – All Things Georgian

Mary Stephens Davies was baptised on 14th December 1761 in the village of Little Haywood near Colwich, Staffordshire, the daughter of Thomas Davies and his wife, Anna. At the tender age of … Continue reading

03/16/2018 · 2 Comments

How ‘Strange Fruit’ Killed Billie Holiday – Progressive.org

“Strange Fruit” may have been written by American songwriter and poet Abel Meeropol (a.k.a. Lewis Allen), but ever since Billie Holiday sang the three brief stanzas to music in 1937, she’s … Continue reading

03/07/2018 · 1 Comment

Quote • LYN GARDNER • Audiences

There is an undoubted pleasure in watching a classic play unfold to an unknowing audience. I once saw Hedda Gabler in a regional theatre where it was clear from the … Continue reading

02/26/2018 · 4 Comments

Preserving Vivien Leigh’s Photo Albums – Vivien Leigh and Laurence Olivier

I’ve been collecting original Vivien Leigh (and Laurence Olivier, but mostly Vivien) memorabilia in earnest for about 10 years now. It began with vintage fan magazines and playbills, and gradually … Continue reading

02/06/2018 · 1 Comment

Journey’s End: behind the scenes of the new First World War film – History Extra

RC Sherriff wrote his celebrated play Journey’s End in 1928, ten years after the end of the First World War. Praised for capturing the claustrophobia and viciousness of trench warfare … Continue reading

02/05/2018 · 7 Comments

BFI Screenonline: Rediscovered TV Drama

The further back in television history you go, the greater are the gaps in the archival record of transmitted material. This is actually true of most areas of cultural activity … Continue reading

01/28/2018 · 1 Comment

Richard Wroughton (1749-1822): Actor – All Things Georgian

In a previous blog post ‘Miss Jenny Davis as a bride’ we briefly mentioned Richard Wroughton, so thought we would take a closer look at him to see if we … Continue reading

01/25/2018 · 1 Comment

Henry Montague: First Shepherd of the Lambs

Just a quick shout out to honor the natal day of actor Henry James Montague (Henry John Mann, 1843-1878). Montagu came to our attention through that eerie, ghostly portrait above, … Continue reading

01/20/2018 · 1 Comment

Patrick Stewart: my nerve-racking RSC audition with the great John Barton | Stage | The Guardian

In a cold, wet November evening in 1965, I plodded nervously across the Bancroft Gardens in Stratford-upon-Avon. I had at last been accepted to audition for the Royal Shakespeare Company, although … Continue reading

01/19/2018 · 3 Comments

Musty or momentous? Three forgotten hits are back on stage in London

One of the hoariest critical cliches is that if a play is neglected, it is usually with good reason. In fact, many plays gather dust simply because of the wilful … Continue reading

12/06/2017 · 2 Comments

Piaf and Cocteau: Les Enfants Terribles | A R T L▼R K

When I write I disturb. When I make a film I disturb. When I paint I disturb. When I exhibit my paintings I disturb, and I disturb if I don’t. … Continue reading

10/11/2017 · 2 Comments
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